Photo of Stuart Neely (UK)

Stuart Neely (UK)

Introduction 

Whistleblowing is on the rise – both within organisations and to authorities. An increase in whistleblowing is positive: it shows employees feel able to speak up, allows issues to be escalated, investigated and where necessary remediated. However, the increase in whistleblowing also presents challenges for companies to ensure that they are dealing effectively and

This is the second article in our series breaking down the steps that companies will need to take to put in place “reasonable procedures” to prevent fraud. Our first post, which focussed on how to conduct effective fraud risk assessments, can be found here.  

This comes ahead of the new UK failure to

The government have confirmed that the guidance in relation to what constitutes ‘reasonable procedures’ for the prevention of fraud is likely to be published in ‘early summer’, meaning that the new Failure to Prevent Fraud Offence would come into force by the end of the year.

See here for our article summarising the new offence

Many companies are currently considering what steps they need to take in relation to the new UK failure to prevent fraud offence (which is expected to come into force later this year or in early 2025).

By way of recap, a company will be liable for failing to prevent fraud by its associated persons (e.g.

The SFO has published its 5-year strategy document (the Strategy Document), highlighting a number of areas of focus, from international coordination with counterparts to capitalising on technology and incentivising their workforce.

This follows Director of the SFO, Nick Ephgrave’s, speech in February 2024 setting out key priorities (see our recent Investigations and Enforcement horizon

Introduction

As anticipated in our previous horizon scan (see here), the end of 2023 has brought about significant developments in financial crime enforcement and a real focus on fraud. Looking ahead to 2024, we predict that developments affecting organisations doing business in the UK will include:

  1. a focus from organisations on fraud, in particular

As anticipated in our previous blog post on predictions for 2023, this year has brought about significant developments in investigations and a real focus on fraud. Looking ahead to the second half of 2023, we predict that developments affecting UK business or those doing business in the UK will include:

  1. continued reform of corporate criminal

As we enter a recession against the backdrop of ongoing geopolitical instability, we expect to see significant financial crime enforcement and investigations in 2023, including a focus on emerging areas such as ESG, cryptocurrencies, and significant developments in financial sanctions. We predict that developments in 2023 will include:

  1. a renewed focus on fraud, including further